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Diploma Course Wines: Burgundy!

January 26, 2011

I couldn’t resist the exclamation point on the title, because Burgundies are my favorite wines of the world. So hop on and have a quick tour of the region with the six wines we tasted for this unit. In fact, I was so happy tasting these wines that I forgot to take pictures of all but one (of the bottle that came home with me after class!). So label pics from the internet will stand in for my actual photographs this week.

Burgundy:

Wine #1:
2009 Henri Fessey Beaujolais Villages (Gamay grape variety) $12.50 – the color was typical of a young Beaujolais, bright purple. Cherry, black cherry and pungent licorice on the nose, with sweet scents of bubble gum and cotton candy. The wine is dry with low alcohol and low tannins, plenty of red cherry, raspberry, clove and a little herbal flavors of mint.

2009 Henry Fessey Beaujolais Villages

Wine #2:

2008 Chateau de la Chaize Brouilly

2008 Chateau de la Chaize Brouilly (Gamay) $15.99 – one step above is a Beaujolais from a specific town (village). This wine was more ruby in color with strawberry, raspberry and dried fruit followed by a floral or perfume character. Very youthful nose (lots of primary fruit). The wine is dry with just a little more weight on the body, with soft, medium tannins and flavors of similar red fruit to the previous wine but also with cranberry, black pepper and cinnamon.

Wine #3:
2008 Joseph Drouhin ‘Laforet’ Bourgogne Rouge (Pinot Noir) $14.99 – medium ruby color, youthful red cherry aromas with oak influence of cedar and vanilla. Tannins were medium and a little ‘green’ with cranberry, sour cherry, cedar, and a lit unripe flavors of white pepper and leafiness.

Wine #4:
2007 Louis Latour Volnay (Pinot Noir) $30.79 –  as with the Beaujolais, we’re getting higher up the scale in Burgundy. Ruby color with red fruit nose, primarily of strawberry, with a light touch of pepper, some oak aromas of cedar and an herbal aroma of menthol. Medium acidity, tannins and body with characteristic red fruit, cherry, feint cranberry flavors with some black pepper and a bit of savory gaminess. Overall, the nose showed riper fruit than what followed through on the palate, which seemed a little flatter overall with a tart fruit character that kept this wine in the ‘good’ rather than ‘very good’ category.

2007 Louis Latour Volnay

Wine #5:
2004 Fontaine-Gagnard Volnay ‘Clos des Chenes’ Premier Cru (Pinot Noir) $41.25 – garnet color with clear legs; red fruit aromas of cherry, strawberry, licorice with oak aromas of vanilla and cedar. This wine also was showing developing aromas of mushroom and a hint of a gamey or earthy note. The medium tannins were chalky with generous red and black fruit flavors of cherry, black cherry, pungent pepper on the medium-plus length finish. The wine was very good and should continue to develop maturing flavors and qualities for several more years, as judged by the depth on the nose, the concentration of fruit and balance on the palate. The chalky tannins were all that kept this wine from being deemed a wine of superior quality, again pointing to the improvement that a few more years of aging should lend to this wine.

 

Wine #6:
2005 Harmand-Geoffroy Gevrey Chambertin Lavaux Saint Jacques Premier Cru (Pinot Noir) $53.00 – clear, ruby color with dried cherry, oak, charred wood and gamey mushroom on the nose. Medium-plus acidity with cranberry, unripe strawberry, charred wood, hint of tobacco on the palate with a medium-plus length finish. The wine was very good with excellent fruit on the nose and palate, will continue to improve due to the intensity of the fruit and acidity.

2005 Harmand-Geoffroy Gevrey Chambertin

Can you tell that I had the task of reviewing wine #5? It’s easier to come away with more detailed notes when you have 10 minutes to write them rather than trying to jot down your own impressions and while listening to the other participants dissect the wine.

I’d love to expand more on how to find good Burgundies and the varying styles that can be found, even among the small number of varieties used there. But alas, that will have to be for another post…..and my glass of 2008 Benjamin Leroux Savigny Les Beaune (another Burgundy!) is empty.

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One Comment leave one →
  1. MARTE permalink
    February 17, 2011 12:59 pm

    VERY ENLIGHTING. JUST BEGINNING TO ENJOY WINES. I HATE TO ADMIT IT BUT MY CHOICES ARE USUALLY BASED UPON A LABEL CATCHING MY EYE AND OF COURSE PRICE. LOOK FORWARD TO MORE INFO AND HOPEFULLY WE WILL GET TO ATTEND ONE OF YOUR PRESENTATIONS.

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